Your guide to Supreme Court writ petition

petition of certiorari

When filing a writ petition to the Supreme Court, there are some essential factors to keep in mind and to be followed without which the petition might get rejected. While it is not always possible for the general public to know the details of it, legal professionals must be contacted for guidance. Supreme Court is a busy body, and is often piled up with hundreds of petitions and that’s certainly not an easy task. It takes time to check, approve and accept them all. Amidst that pile of papers, writ of petition is one of the most regularly submitted papers, and needless to say, not all petition of certiorari gets approved and accepted. What is writ of certiorari? A writ of certiorari is a legal document by which it is ordered to a lower court to deliver its record in a case so that the higher court may review it. The U.S. Supreme Court uses certiorari to select most of the cases it hears. The writ of certiorari is a common law writ, which may be abrogated or controlled entirely by statute or court rules. How to format a writ? According to the United States Supreme Court Rule 33(1) (c), it is a must to follow a particular format to get it approved at one go. The basic format isn’t known to everyone, and hence, it is advisable to either make a guideline or get it done by professionals. Requirements to remember when producing a petition of certiorari:
  • The papers used must be fully opaque and unglazed.
  • A margin of at least ¾ inch must be maintained on all sides of the paper.
  • The footnotes and text field must measure 4⅛ by 7⅛ inches.
  • Before presenting it to the Supreme Court, it must be produced in a booklet format.
  • The booklet must be maintained at a standard size of 6⅛ by 9¼ inches.
  • The booklet must not weight less than 60 pounds.
  • The cover of the brief must be of 65-pound weight paper.
What about the binding? Quite similar to the paper type, size and weight, the binding type too is important as far as writ format of Supreme Court is concerned. Types of binding: There are typically two ways to bind the papers – saddle stitch and perfect binding. It depends entirely up to counsel for the litigant which one of the two binding types is to be adopted. Particulars about saddle stitch and perfect binding:
  • Saddle stitch is easier to bind but harder to print as compared to that in case of perfect binding.
  • In perfect binding, 8.5″x 11″ sized paper can be adjusted to get the 6.125″x 9.25″ size paper version with the use of tape binding. In case of saddle stitch, a large format printer is must, as 12.25″x9.25″ size papers can never fit into a regular printer.
  • No part of the binding should obscure the text in the documents.
  • Spiral, metal, plastic or string bindings are strictly prohibited.]
If you feel this is difficult for you to get the petition of certiorari done all by yourself, and if you are looking for professional help, get in touch with Supreme Court Paper on http://supremecourtpaper.com or at 1 (855) 776-3800 for more.

Stitch or binding? What’s the ideal method to file a writ petition?

writ format

To file a writ petition so that it does get accepted, there must be some guidelines to be followed which are often not possible for the general public to be aware of. Hence, legal professionals come to the rescue, the ones who have a vivid knowledge about the right format of writ petition.

writ format Supreme Court is loaded under so many petitions, letters and documents   that it is a daunting task to check, approve and accept them all. The writ   of petition is one of those that are applied in the Supreme Court in   thousands regularly. However, the writ format is a distinct criterion on   which the approval or rejection of the petition depends a lot. The proper   format, paper and binding is, hence, very crucial to let the Supreme   Court hear your case.

  What’s the proper format of a writ? As per the United States Supreme Court Rule 33(1) (c), the writs must be presented in a particular format otherwise they will not get approved. The following are the requirements which should be maintained when producing a petition of certiorari:
  • Only opaque and unglazed papers must be used.
  • There must be a margin of at least ¾ inch on all sides of the paper.
  • The footnotes and text field must measure 4⅛ by 7⅛ inches.
  • It must be produced in a booklet format before presenting it to the Supreme Court.
  • The standard size of the booklet must be 6⅛ by 9¼ inches.
  • The booklet must not be less than 60 pounds in weight.
  • The cover of the brief must be of 65-pound weight paper.
About the binding format: While the type and size of booklet is crucial enough, the binding type is no less important as far as writ format of Supreme Court is concerned. There are typically two ways to do it – saddle stitch and perfect binding. It depends entirely up to counsel for the litigant which one of the two binding types is to be adopted. Difference between Saddle Stitch and Perfect Binding:
  • Saddle stitch is easier to bind but harder to print as compared to that in case of perfect binding.
  • In perfect binding, 8.5″x11″ sized paper can be adjusted to get the 6.125″x9.25″ size paper version with the use of tape binding.
  • In case of saddle stitch, a large format printer is must, as 12.25″x9.25″ size papers can never fit into a regular printer.
  • The binding of the saddle stitch, once printed, is easy with only a long armed stapler to do the work.
  • No part of the binding should obscure the text in the documents.
  • Spiral, metal, plastic or string bindings are strictly prohibited.
These few things must be kept in mind while dealing with the writ format so that the petition is not rejected at the Supreme Court. You may anytime contact professional lawyers at Supreme Court Paper at http://supremecourtpaper.com/ or call at (855) 776-3800 to get detailed information.

Saddle Stitch or Perfect Binding?

It’s entirely up to you.  But here are the considerations. Saddle stitch is harder to print, easier to bind.  Perfect binding is easier to print, harder to bind.  For perfect binding, your regular printer that can print up to 8.5″x11″ paper will do the trick.  You’ll just adjust the guides in the paper tray to fit the smaller 6.125″x9.25″ paper.  But then you’ll need to take that paper to a shop that will apply a perfect binding (tape binding will probably work here too), which involves heat and glue. For saddle stitch, you will need a large-format printer.  The reason: no matter which way you turn it, 12.25″x9.25″ is just barely too big for a regular printer.  (Usually, the dimension that fails is the 9.25″, as your 12.25″ side will fit in most printers that can print 8.5″x14″ [legal] paper.  But the width cannot exceed 8.66″.)  But, once you’ve got it printed, all that you need is a stapler with a long arm, and your petition is bound!

I’m going to lose. Should I really file this?

Only you can decide that.  But we’re here to make that decision easier.  If you are looking at risking over $2,000 just to file your petition, plus whatever you are forgoing in a potential settlement, the decision is very different than if you are looking at risking less than $750 (including the filing fee).  The way we think about this is a game-theory concept called minimax regret. Basically, you want to minimize regretting your decision in the worst-case scenario. We’re here to help–if you file and lose, and spend less money doing that, you’ll have less to regret!

Writ Petition Format Supreme Court

It goes without saying that the Supreme Court of the United States deals with a mountain of paper. Filing documents with the Supreme Court must follow a certain set of guidelines and regulations in order for the petitions and files to be accepted.

For those filing the writ of certiorari should be aware of the specifications of the size and type of paper that must be used to avoid that filing being rejected by the Court. But is it possible for every attorney to know about the requirements for filing a writ? Typically not. This is why you should consult the experienced legal professionals as they have the complete knowledge of the distinctive formatting requirements for such petitions.

As per the United States Supreme Court Rule 33(1) (c), the writs must be presented in a particular format otherwise they will not get approved. The following are the requirements which should be maintained when producing a petition of certiorari:

  • they must be produced in a booklet format to the Supreme Court
  • the papers used in the booklet must be 6⅛ by 9¼ inches in size
  • they must not weigh less than 60 pounds
  • opaque, unglazed papers should be used
  • the margins should be at least ¾ inch on all sides of the paper
  • footnotes and text field must be 4⅛ by 7⅛ inches in measurement
  • the cover of the brief must be of 65-pound weight paper

More about the typesetting

Apart from the paper details, the writ format should also maintain the specified typesetting.

The standard ones include photo composition, computer typesetting, and hot metal, however, word processing, image setting, and electronic publishing are also equally acceptable. The type process should be produced on a clear, black image on the white paper with the clarity equal to or exceeding that of laser printing. However, the typewriter prints are not acceptable.

About the binding

The binding is is also important for writ petition format Supreme Court as the print and the paper specifications. Typically, there are two ways to do it - saddle stitch or perfect binding and it is entirely up to counsel for the litigant which one to adopt for as there are some basic differences between the two.

In case of perfect binding, saddle stitch is easier to bind but harder to print. Moreover, for perfect binding, 8.5″x11″ paper can be adjusted to get the 6.125″x9.25″ paper version, only that it would need to be taken to a shop for the tape binding. In case of saddle stitch, a large format printer is required as 12.25″x9.25″ can no way fit into a regular printer. But once done, a stapler with a long arm would work.

No part of the binding should obscure the text in the documents. Spiral, metal, plastic or string bindings are strictly prohibited

Why us?

With the aim to make the stationery supplies for filings to the Supreme Court of the United States easy for attorneys, SupremeCourtPaper.com is a trusted name amongst lawyers. For any further questions, call +1 (855) 776-3800 to get detailed information about your requirements for the sheets and the cover papers for the writ 24/7 at competitive pricing and excellent quality.